TAWN » Blog Archives

Author Archives: Carol Garr

Uncategorized

Tucson Peace Fair 2018

Published by:

Saturday, February 24, 2018, 11 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Armoury Park

Fun, music, food, and at least 70 tables and booths will be present, urging all the good causes: peace, environmentalism, religious tolerance, and others. Have a great time and show your support!

Uncategorized

Ritual volunteers needed!

Published by:

We are starting to get some volunteers for some of our public rituals, but many are still open. So far, only Ostara and Mabon are spoken for. I would especially appreciate seeing some other traditions besides eclectic Wicca, as we have several of those scheduled. Remember, the officiant can set the date, time, and place to fit their schedule. I’ve heard several “maybes” but before I fill a slot I need a firm commitment. Will any of you step up?

Rituals

Mabon/Fall Equinox ritual after Fall Fest

Published by:

Julie & Carrie of AZCUUPS have volunteered to lead the ritual for Mabon, at 6PM, after Fall Fest on Sept 22nd. As we will already be there at the church (4831 E. 22nd St) the logistics will be easy, and they are hoping to be able to get us some kind of discount as well. This will be a joint celebration with their congregation, so it may have extra-good attendance. That will a great opportunity to expose their people to TAWN as well. It will be an eclectic Wiccan ritual. I have met with them, and they seem to be delightful ladies, with experience leading public rites. I’m looking forward to it.

Rituals

Open Ostara Ritual 3/20/18

Published by:

Greetings all. I have agreed to lead a Spring Equinox/Ostara ritual jointly for  Southern AZ Covenant of Unitarian Universalist Pagans (sazcuups) and TAWN. This will be a Wiccan rite, with a snack potluck to follow. They usually conclude by 8PM, so not too late for those of you who work in the morning. It will be held at 6PM on TUESDAY 3/20 (the actual Equinox) at the Unitarian church at 4831 E. 22nd St. This is the same location we have had Fall Fest for some years now. In keeping with my usual practice we will be outside unless the weather doesn’t allow otherwise. Hope to see you there.

Rituals

Looking for ritual volunteers

Published by:

Volunteers still needed to lead TAWN open rituals! Patrick & Morgana have graciously offered to lead our Imbolc/Candlemas Circle, but many others are still available, including one for Spring Fest. Any Nature-based tradition welcome. I ask only for knowledge of your faith, and confidence and competence in leading a rite for the public. You pick the date, time, and location. Please contact your ritual coordinator, Carol Garr, at carol@garden-realty.com or 520-883-4444.

Rituals

Thanks to Hearths Gate Kindred for Yule ritual

Published by:

The Yule Ritual was well attended with some 30 folks, plus 4 celebrants in attendance. (Total 35).

The ritual celebrations of the solstice and season, along with a feast, ran for about 3 hours around the Yule Fires, with a splendid potluck of hot roasts, stews, pies and other delicious warmness.  Wassail and other warm goodies were to hand and a truly festive occasion was had.

TAWN appreciates your efforts to offer a meaningful celebration for our members and guests.

Why Is Tawn

A Perspective Changing Event with Stone Soup

Published by:

Once upon a time, a weary traveler happened upon a village, carrying nothing more than his staff and an empty cooking pot.  Upon arrival of this stranger, the villagers become suspicious of him and are unwilling to share any of their food stores.  Realizing how hard the times were in this village, the traveler gives careful consideration.  He takes his cooking pot, fills it with water at a local well and places it over a fire.  All the while, he is watched by the villagers.  As he crouches beside the pot, he drops a large, round stone ceremoniously into the water.  The traveler then begins to stir the pot, all the while making sounds of enjoyment.  The villagers, becoming curious, come out and inquire about the pot.  The charismatic traveler answers that he is making a very special soup, which tastes wonderful, although it still needs a little bit of garnish to improve the flavor, which, sadly, the traveler is missing.  The villagers, captivated by the idea that a stone could produce such a thing, realize they do not mind parting with a few items from their meager stores to help this soup along.  In the end, a delicious and nourishing pot of soup is enjoyed by all with very little effort.

When I first read this story, I imagined the villagers as a wary, hungry, war-torn people struggling to make ends meet, and that any help extended meant less for them or their families later on.  Then, one day, a stranger walks into their lives and completely changes their perspective on sharing with others.  There is a simple moral to this story: when we set aside our differences and work together, with everyone contributing what they can, a greater good is achieved.  Many seem to think that the term “passing the hat” is an awful, uncomfortable thing and makes people feel pushed, cajoled, wheedled, soft-soaped or prevailed upon.  Just as the charismatic traveler did, we too need to change the perception of participation. Participation has many levels… passing the hat is just one of them.

TAWN is a non-profit organization working toward a greater good within our community.  But, what does “non-profit” mean?  The definition of “non-profit” does not mean that we work with dry coffers!  The literal definition of a non-profit organization means that we do not earn profits for any owners, and all of the money earned by or donated to TAWN is used in pursuing the organization’s objectives.  But, who are our mysterious owners?  And what are these unknown objectives?  Believe it or not, we are all owners of TAWN.  Any member is the face of TAWN.  As such, we have responsibility to ourselves and our neighbors, whether or not they believe the same as we do.  Those neighbors are also owners of TAWN… any contributions they choose to make are just as effective as a member’s, whether through volunteering or donating.  And those unknown objectives?  They are simply the stone in the pot.  Think of all the amazing things we could cook up together!

Asking for donations shouldn’t be viewed as a gambit.  The villagers may be a wary lot, and seem unwilling to participate.  However, if we change our perception of the word “donation” just a bit, we can help others, as well as ourselves, realize that in order to reach our full potential, all we need is to add is a little ingredient to the pot.